The invention of the instant noodle

The invention of the instant noodle

Instant noodles are a type of pre-cooked noodle, usually sold in individual packets or cups and bowls.After the noodles have been made in the factory, they are steamed, dried and packaged.

Momofuku Ando, The Inventor of instant noodles

In 1958 Taiwan-born Momofuku Ando invented instant noodles in Japan, who later went on to invent Cup Noodles. It was first marketed in 1958 by his company Nissin, under the brand name Chikin Ramen. By 2013 the global demand for instant noodles had reached 105 billion packets. The Momofuku Ando Instant Ramen Museum in Osaka includes a recreation of the garden shed in which he carried out his research and created a new food culture.

Momofuku Ando’s Workshop

Momofuku Ando created instant ramen after world war II to help feed the survivors of the atomic bombs in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Momofuku realized that ramen was a comfort food and was driven to create a type of ramen people didn’t have to wait in line to get.

Instant Cook Chikin Ramen year 1958

In 1958, his first ramen creation “Chikin Ramen” got a huge success because it was delicious, cheap, and easy to make.

China’s Noodles store

China consumes the most instant ramen noodles in the world approximately 40 billion servings per year.Consumption basis,  China eats more instant ramen than any other country. According to the World Instant Noodles Association, Chinese mainlanders and Hong Kong residents combined ate more than 40 billion servings of instant noodles in 2019.

When instant noodles were first introduced in Japanese grocery stores, they were typically six times more expensive than fresh noodles. However, today instant ramen is considered one of the cheapest  foods in grocery stores. Indonesia is the second-highest country when it comes to consuming instant noodles. In 2019, the people of Indonesia ate more than 12 billion servings. The United States falls slightly behind, and only consumes an average of 4 billion servings, ranking sixth in the world for instant noodle demand.

According to instantnoodles.org Spreading first to Asia and then to Americas and Europe, instant noodles have become accepted globally. Especially with the rise of income level in developing countries in the 1990s, the consumption increased rapidly there. Annual global demand for instant noodles was estimated approximately 15 billion servings in 1990, and the demand grew to 50 billion servings in 2001 and exceeded 100 billion servings mark in 2012. According to a report by Bloomberg, Walmart’s online sales of instant noodles jumped 578% between February 23 and March 21.

Top Ramen instant noodles brand came to the United States in 1970.However, he realized that many Americans didn’t own the traditional noodle bowls used by people in Asian countries. He then set about inventing an alternative container for his product. In 1971, Nissin Foods introduced Cup Noodles in a foam cup, which became extremely popular worldwide.

According to BBC, Ando said the inspiration for the famous Cup Noodles came from watching people lining up to buy bowls of hot ramen noodle soup at a black market stall during the food shortages after World War II.

In 1972, Nissin began producing Top Ramen in the United States, and by 1973 Cup Noodles were also partially US-produced and distributed to American grocery stores.

According to one survey, the Japanese believe their best invention of the 20th century was instant noodles.

Cup Noodles Museum in Yokohama, Japan

There’s even a Cup Noodles Museum in Osaka, Japan.The museum was opened in 1999 by Momofuku Ando, the inventor of Cup Noodles.

Cup Noodles Museum in Osaka

The museum features multiple exhibits and attractions inspired by the history of instant noodles, ranging from a make-your-own Cup Noodles factory to an interactive theater in the shape of Cup Noodles.

Here’s one thing we can say – instant noodles are the world’s true convenience food, the hot food that’s always waiting there, in the background, for those who are short on money or time.

Subscribe
Notify of
guest
0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments